Instant Coffee

AreoShot Coffee Inhalers

AreoShot, a new coffee inhaler, is now on the market in New York and Massachussets.  Its also available in France and online.

The inhaler comes in a cannister about the size of a lipstick tube.  It contains 100 mg of caffeine powder and costs $2.99.  The airborne energy particles coat the inside of your mouth and back of the throat, then are swallowed, Massachusetts General Hospital reports. The particles dissolve quickly and are reportedly too large to reach the lungs.

It was created by David Edwards who is a biomedical engineering professor.  Mr. Edwards claims the product is safe, but US Senator Charles Schumer of New York is calling for a FDA review of the now-unregulated energy product. Edwards, however, dismisses fears that inhaling caffeine might be harmful as “a bit of hysteria” and “the knee-jerk reaction” to anything new, according to USA Today.

Critics fear that it will be used as a drug by partiers.  “You want those 10 cups of coffee, it will probably take you a couple hours to get through all that coffee with all that volume that you are drinking,” Lisa Ganijhu, MD, an internist at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City, told ABC News. “With these inhaled caffeine canisters you can get that in 10 of those little canisters — so you just puff away and you could be getting all of that within the hour.”

The packaging warns people not to consume more than three AreoShots a day, well within the safe range for caffeine consumption. According to Massachusetts General Hospital, you’d have to consume about 80 inhalers (8,000 mg. of caffeine) to risk death by caffeine, since such a massive amount could cause a dangerous heartbeat abnormality called ventricular fibrillation.  Three cups of coffee or three AeroShots deliver about 300 mg. of caffeine, considered a moderate, safe intake. Amounts above 750 to 1,000 mg. a day can be risky, due to the potential for “caffeine intoxication,” marked by such symptoms as anxiety, facial flushing, rapid or irregular heartbeat, impaired judgment, GI upset and insomnia.

Coffee Cures Cellulite

Women have fought to get rid of cellulite for years.  Now it seems that there is a way to rid yourself of the unsightly stuff.  Coffee!!!.  That’s right, plain, caffeinated coffee.

Putting coffee on your skin seems to reduce cellulite, or at the very least, the appearance of it.  Cosmetic companies have caught on to this and are now using coffee and/or caffiene in some of their anti-cellulite creams.  Look for it on the label.  Of course, you can also use coffee grounds to get the same effect, but it is much more messy than the creams, which can be expensive. 

If you choose to use coffee grounds, its important to do so at least 3 times a week to acheive and maintain the desired results.  To do the treatment with coffee grounds, apply warm coffee grounds all over your body and massage it in. Then you wrap yourself in plastic wrap for twenty minutes. 

So how does this work? 

The caffeine in coffee is the secret.  Caffeine helps widen the blood vessel of the body and stimulates the fat cells, breaking them down. Warning though, if you drink huge amounts of coffee daily, your cellulite could look worse. It seems that caffeine when ingested promotes more cellulite formation.  Topical application of caffeine does not have this effect.

The rule of thumb when it comes to cellulite?  Slather the coffee on and keep it comming for cellulite free thighs.

Starbucks Sticks v. Nescafe Sticks

Starbucks came out with the Starbucks VIA Ready Brew Stick packets and then, as always, some one else comes along to create competition.  Who is that competition?  Nescafe Taster’s Choice, who vow that their instant sticks are more flavorful than Starbucks, but perhaps most importantly in this economy, they claim to be four times cheaper.  You read that right 4 times cheaper that Starbucks Sticks!

The Chicago Tribune found that, on average, one packet of Nescafe costs 19cents per packet as opposed to Starbucks which costs approximately 83 cents per packet.  The price is obviously much better, but what about the taste?  The Tribune also conducted a blind taste test with six testers to find out if the money you are saving is equal to the flavor you may or may not be loosing by getting the cheaper product.

The test included not only the the Colombian of both brands of sticks, but also a brewed Colombian.  No surprise, the brewed coffee won hands down, but that is not what we are concerned with.  Back to the sticks! 

Starbucks Sticks came in a close second followed by Nescafe.  One person thought that Starbucks were too bitter and sharp.  Most tasters described Nescafe as being thin, weak or like cardboard. 

When mixed with cold water for iced coffee, Starbucks dissolved easily.  Nescafe also mixed well, but do to the larger granules required more stirring.  So now its time for you to decide, is the flavor worth the cost???  That is the million dollar question.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/food/chi-tc-food-tastings-0605-0610jun10,0,129961.htmlstory

Coffee Can’t Hurt, Might Help

There is always ongoing research as to how coffee effects the body.  Coffee used to get a bad wrap, but not anymore.   Studies show that it couldprotect against diabetes,  heart disease and stroke, liver cancer, cirrhosis and Parkinson’s disease.   Coffee is also helpful for athletes to help them achieve the optimum in performance. 

 Why did earlier studies not show this?  Perhaps it is because many coffee drinkers also smoke which skewed the previous tests on coffee.  It is important to account for all factors when doing medical research so that you can truly evaluate the specific thing that you are testing, in this case, coffee.

For more information and to read the full story, check out the following link.  

 http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/la-he-coffee18-2009may18,0,2647860.column?track=rss

This article was written by Judy Forman.  You can check out her site at www.myhealthsense.com